Non radiometric chronometric dating techniques

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The time required for half the original number of parent atoms to decay is called the half life.Some half-lives are listed below: It follows that uranium-lead, potassium-argon (K-Ar), and Rubidium-Strontium (Rb-Sr) decay can be used for very long time periods, whilst radiocarbon dating can only be used up to about 70,000 years. This uses a simple exponential decay formula linking the original number, Po, of parent atoms in rocks and minerals to the P atoms now present, thereby enabling an estimate of geological age.But YE scientists point out some anomalies in relation to C-14 and a very old earth.For instance, measurable amounts of C-14 have been found in fossil material, such as coal (traditionally Carboniferous period c300 mya).Mathematically, P = Po exp(-lambda T), where lambda = the decay constant and T = the period of decay. a zero initial number of D atoms, where P(or D) = the current number of P(or D) atoms, it follows that the age of a rock or mineral is computed as T=(1/lambda)ln(1 D/P).

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This age is obtained from radiometric dating and is assumed by evolutionists to provide a sufficiently long time-frame for Darwinian evolution.And OE Christians (theistic evolutionists) see no problem with this dating whilst still accepting biblical creation, see Radiometric Dating - A Christian Perspective.This is the crucial point: it is claimed by some that an old earth supports evolutionary theory and by implication removes the need for biblical creation.The technique gave 90 million years, but took no account of the non-constant erosion rate, or the loss and recycling of salt, or the fact that salt is obtained from other sources as well as continents.More recently, work has been done on ocean sediments [S. This suggests that, given the current annual rates of erosion (some 27.5 billion tons), all earth's continents would be delivered into the oceans in just 14 million years.

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