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Established in 2004, a whole six years prior to Tinder, the dating site OKCupid ensured its longevity when it sought help from Tinder in 2013 to implement the swipe into its own platform.

It was a year later when OKCupid founder Christian Rudder published , a book which collects illustrated data visualizations with stats from OKC user profiles.

That data matches Tinder’s data exactly.’s findings, Jack Linshi explained OKC’s 1 to 5 scale and how different racial groups of women rated Asian men.

It wasn’t high.“While Asian women are more likely to give Asian men higher ratings, women of other races—black, Latina, white—give Asian men a rating between 1 and 2 stars less than what they usually rate men,” wrote Linshi.

By distilling dates down to a profile picture and a swipe, Tinder encourages users to act on their knee-jerk reactions, and that lightning fast process lights up corners of our minds we haven’t fully grappled with as a society.

Black women and Asian men make up two demographics that have been long stigmatized as not-ideal sexual and romantic partners. It’s that the app compiles data on the quick preferences, and prejudices, of millions around the world, exposing an uncomfortable and racist reality.

“Black and Latin men faced ‘similar discrimination,’ while white men had ratings “most high among women of all races.”Meanwhile, black women were considered the “least desirable” among all races of men.

The same went for black women — they were the least desired by white men and excluded by 90% of anyone with a racial preference in dating.

Basic knowledge of human history, particularly American history, reveal where and how the alienation of black women and Asian men began.

(It’s important to note that these subjects are dense enough to fill whole libraries, so further reading elsewhere is encouraged.) European colonists who orchestrated the African slave trade created caricatures, such as the Jezebel and the Sapphire, in order to further dehumanize and stereotype black women.

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